Leg or Arm Amputation: Car Crashes and Workplace Accidents Account for 45% of all Amputations

Leg or Arm Amputation: Car Crashes and Workplace Accidents Account for 45% of all Amputations

There are close to 2 million people in the United States living with a loss of a limb or extremity. Trauma from a car crash or workplace accident represent 45% of all amputations. (Source: Amputee Coalition). Motor vehicle accidents, motorcycle accidents, bicycle accidents or a pedestrian being struck by a car, motorcycle or bike as well as workplace injuries and falls all may lead to an amputation. Below knee amputations are the most common amputation.

Arm and Elbow Injuries

Arm and Elbow Injuries

The arm is a very complicated structure and is capable of lifting and carrying great amounts of weight and bending in all types of directions. We rely heavily on our arms. Our arms play a major role in helping us perform some of our basic daily functions. They also allows us to swing a golf club, shoot a basketball and perform some of the many other activities that rely on the arms. The arm consists of three bones, two joints and several muscles, tendons and nerves. All these parts play an important role in helping the arm function. Without the proper care or treatment an injury to one area can result in complications that will affect to entire arm.

Dislocated Elbow

Dislocated Elbow

There are two types of dislocated elbows: a partial dislocation (subluxation) and a complete dislocation. A partial dislocation occurs when the ulna bone and or radius bone partially separates from the humerus and elbow joint. A complete dislocation occurs when the ulna bone and or radius bone completely separates from the humerus or elbow joint.

Biceps Tendon Tear at Elbow

Biceps Tendon Tear at Elbow

A biceps muscle will not grow back after it tears away from the forearm bone. Someone with a torn lower bicep will have to rely on other muscles to help stabilize the elbow, bend the arm and rotate the forearm. A torn lower biceps can result in a 30% reduction in elbow bending strength and a 40% reduction in forearm rotation strength. We rely heavily on our biceps and a lower biceps tear can have a serious impact on our day-to-day lives.

Ulnar Nerve Entrapment Injury

Ulnar Nerve Entrapment Injury

Ulnar nerve injuries are caused by trauma, the aging process and pressure. The most common cause of ulnar nerve injury is ulnar nerve entrapment. The ulnar nerve can get entrapped or compressed (impinged) on its way from the shoulder to the hand. Ulnar nerve entrapment or compression occurs most frequently at the elbow.

Radial Head Fracture At The Elbow

Radial Head Fracture At The Elbow

Radial head fractures are a common fracture and they account for approximately 20% of all elbow fracture injuries. People between ages of twenty and forty are most prone to this type of elbow fracture. Women are more likely to sustain a broken radial head.

This injury is so common because it is often associated with slip and fall accidents. Our instinct tells us to stick an arm or hand out in order to brace for a fall. Often times when we do this our elbow either sustains a direct impact or an indirect impact which occurs when the impact from a fall travels up the hand, to the forearm and into the elbow joint.

Distal Humerus Fracture at the Elbow

Distal Humerus Fracture at the Elbow

A broken distal humerus occurs when there is a fracture in the bottom end (distal region) of the humerus bone. This region is also known as the humeral head. A fractured distal humerus is a kind of elbow fracture. A fracture in one of the three bones that make-up the elbow joint will constitute an elbow fracture.