Larynx Fracture

Larynx Fracture

Laryngeal fractures can occur as the result of accidents involving direct trauma to the neck, most commonly as a result of car accidents. The injury can lead to an instant, serious airway obstruction that is life-threatening, thus all larynx fractures must be treated as serious emergencies. They can also be associated with open neck, esophageal, and intracranial injuries, as well as cervical spine fractures.

Calcaneus Fractures & Broken Heel Bones

Calcaneus Fractures & Broken Heel Bones

A calcaneus fracture occurs when there is a break to the heel bone. Although somewhat uncommon, they can occur as the result of a high-impact event—such as a car accident or a fall—or a twisting injury to the ankle. As a result, the heel typically becomes deformed, and surgery is required in order to reconstruct the normal shape of the heel and provide mobility.

Talus Fracture & Broken Ankle Bones

Talus Fracture & Broken Ankle Bones

The talus (or ankle) bone connects the back of the foot with the leg, joining with the tibia and fibula to form the ankle joint, and allowing for motion within the ankle. Fracturing the talus is thus equal to breaking the ankle bone, and typically involves severe ankle pain, bruising, and swelling, with an inability to walk due to these symptoms.

Maxillary Fracture (Broken Upper Jaw)

Maxillary Fracture (Broken Upper Jaw)

The maxilla connects the dental occlusal plane inferiority and cranial base superiorly, ultimately joining with the nasal cavity, oral cavity, and various other important bodily structures. When these bones are fractured, the injury can be life-threatening and disfiguring. These types of fractures often result from car accidents, as well as falls and altercations and as the result of high-energy blunt force.

Mandibular Fracture (Broken Lower Jaw)

Mandibular Fracture (Broken Lower Jaw)

Mandibular fractures, also known as lower jaw fractures, are quite due to the location of the mandible bone and the lack of support for the mandible. These fractures are common among men between 21 to 30 years old. A lower jaw fracture is the most common facial fracture after nasal fractures. Mandible fractures are usually caused by a direct blow to the lower jaw like when the head snaps forward and strikes the steering wheel during a car accident. Most people that sustain a fractured mandible bone experience bleeding in their mouth and a feeling that their teeth are not aligned properly.

Nasal Fractures (Broken Nose)

Nasal Fractures (Broken Nose)

Nasal fractures can occur as the result of direct trauma, which most commonly results from car accidents, falls, contact sports, and/or fights. Nasal fractures, or broken noses, are the most common types of all facial bone fractures. The most commonly affected age group is men between the ages of 15 and 30, and many of them suffer from lateral impact injuries.

Hand Fracture

Hand Fracture

Hand fractures can occur in the small (phalanges) or long (metacarpals) bones of the fingers, and are typically the result of a crush or twisting injury, fall, or strong, direct impact. There can be pain, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or an inability to move the affected fingers, hand, and/or wrist, depressed knuckle, and even deformity (of the fingers affected) involved.

Bimalleolar and Trimalleolar Fractures

Bimalleolar and Trimalleolar Fractures

Fractures occur when one or more of the ankle bones are broken. There are numerous types of ankle fractures that can occur, but two of the more serious types are bimalleolar and trimalleolar fractures. In general, the more bones that are broken, the more unstable the ankle joint becomes, and ligaments can become damaged, as well.

Chest/Thoracic Trauma

Chest/Thoracic Trauma

Chest trauma describes any physical injury to the chest, including to the lungs, heart, and ribs. Chest trauma specifically due to blunt force is a significant source of mortality in the United States. In fact, some statistics indicate that it accounts for 25% of all deaths due to traumatic injuries. It can lead to damage to the various thoracic cavity components, including the lungs, ribs, esophagus, heart, and the diaphragm.

Leg or Arm Amputation: Car Crashes and Workplace Accidents Account for 45% of all Amputations

Leg or Arm Amputation: Car Crashes and Workplace Accidents Account for 45% of all Amputations

There are close to 2 million people in the United States living with a loss of a limb or extremity. Trauma from a car crash or workplace accident represent 45% of all amputations. (Source: Amputee Coalition). Motor vehicle accidents, motorcycle accidents, bicycle accidents or a pedestrian being struck by a car, motorcycle or bike as well as workplace injuries and falls all may lead to an amputation. Below knee amputations are the most common amputation.

Child Growth Plate Fracture

Child Growth Plate Fracture

The majority of growth plate fractures heal properly. However, a small percentage can result in stunting the growth of the bone or causing the bone to curve or grow in an irregular shape. This can occur if the fracture is to the cartilage portion located at the end of the bone. A fracture can disrupt the circulation of the blood supply to the cartilage. Without proper circulation the cartilage may never form into bone.

Flail Chest—Broken Rib Cage: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Pursuing an Accident Claim

Flail Chest—Broken Rib Cage: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Pursuing an Accident Claim

If you are experiencing chest pain and shortness of breath after a traumatic incident or a car crash, you may have broken your rib cage, or have flail chest. Make sure you are examined and diagnosed by a medical doctor immediately. You may be able to pursue compensation for damages such as medical bills, pain and suffering, permanent injury or disability, costs of physical therapy and rehabilitation, lost wages from missed work, diminished earning capacity, mental anguish and emotional distress, punitive damages, and/or property damage or loss.

Skull Fractures — Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Pursuing a Legal Claim

Skull Fractures — Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Pursuing a Legal Claim

The most visible symptom of a skull fracture is a bump or bruise on the head. Keep in mind however, that it may take up to 24 hours for the bump or bruise to develop. Sometimes bleeding from the wound, ears, nose and around the eyes occurs or bruising behind the ears or under the eyes. Victims suffer from confusion, convulsions, difficulties with balance, drowsiness, headache, loss of consciousness, nausea and vomiting, restlessness, irritability, slurred speech, stiff neck, swelling, and visual disturbances.

Pelvic Fracture—Broken Pelvis

Pelvic Fracture—Broken Pelvis

Blunt trauma are injuries that occur to the pelvic region because of a fall, motor vehicle accident, motorcycle accident, bicycle accident or a pedestrian being struck by a car, motorcycle or bike. Because the pelvis has many parts, injury in one location often means a second location also contains a break.

Dislocated Hip

Dislocated Hip

If you have experienced a hip dislocation after a traumatic incident or a car crash, you may have injured your hip. Make sure you are examined and diagnosed by a medical doctor immediately. You may be able to pursue compensation for damages such as medical bills, pain and suffering, permanent injury or disability, costs of physical therapy and rehabilitation, lost wages from missed work, diminished earning capacity, mental anguish and emotional distress, punitive damages, and/or property damage or loss.

About Hip Fractures (Broken Hip) Caused by Accidents

About Hip Fractures (Broken Hip) Caused by Accidents

If you have experienced a pelvic fracture after a traumatic incident or a car crash, you may have injured your hip. Make sure you are examined and diagnosed by a medical doctor immediately. You may be able to pursue compensation for damages such as medical bills, pain and suffering, permanent injury or disability, costs of physical therapy and rehabilitation, lost wages from missed work, diminished earning capacity, mental anguish and emotional distress, punitive damages, and/or property damage or loss.

About Child Femur Fractures (Thigh Bone) Caused by Accidents

About Child Femur Fractures (Thigh Bone) Caused by Accidents

The femur, or thighbone, is the biggest bone in the human body. Because it is the biggest it is also the strongest. A tremendous amount of force is requirement for the femur bone to fracture. That is why these bones rarely break. High impact car accidents or falls on a hard surface from high above the ground are capable of generating enough force to break the human body’s strongest bone. 3 out of every 10,000 people under the age of 25 will experience a femur fracture every year.

About Child Clavicle Fractures (Broken Collar Bone) Resulting From Accidents

About Child Clavicle Fractures (Broken Collar Bone) Resulting From Accidents

A broken clavicle causes significant pain to the affected area and makes it difficult to move the arm and shoulder. Often times the skin around the collarbone will be swollen, tender and bruised. A popping or crackling noise can result when attempting to raise your hand. A bulge, bump or some other deformity will exist above the clavicle. This is the displaced bone. A compound fracture could cause the bone to pierce the skin. A clavicle fracture will also cause the shoulder to sag.

Arm and Elbow Injuries

Arm and Elbow Injuries

The arm is a very complicated structure and is capable of lifting and carrying great amounts of weight and bending in all types of directions. We rely heavily on our arms. Our arms play a major role in helping us perform some of our basic daily functions. They also allows us to swing a golf club, shoot a basketball and perform some of the many other activities that rely on the arms. The arm consists of three bones, two joints and several muscles, tendons and nerves. All these parts play an important role in helping the arm function. Without the proper care or treatment an injury to one area can result in complications that will affect to entire arm.

Radial Head Fracture At The Elbow

Radial Head Fracture At The Elbow

Radial head fractures are a common fracture and they account for approximately 20% of all elbow fracture injuries. People between ages of twenty and forty are most prone to this type of elbow fracture. Women are more likely to sustain a broken radial head.

This injury is so common because it is often associated with slip and fall accidents. Our instinct tells us to stick an arm or hand out in order to brace for a fall. Often times when we do this our elbow either sustains a direct impact or an indirect impact which occurs when the impact from a fall travels up the hand, to the forearm and into the elbow joint.

Fractured Proximal Humerus (Broken Arm)

Fractured Proximal Humerus (Broken Arm)

Five percent of all fractures involve the proximal humerus. People sixty-five years and older sustain more proximal humerus fractures than any other kind of fracture expect hip and wrist fractures. The top of the humerus is also known as the humeral head. The humeral head connects with the shoulder blade to form the shoulder joint.

Broken Shoulder Blade (Scapula Fracture)

Broken Shoulder Blade (Scapula Fracture)

Scapula fractures represent less than one percent of all fracture injuries. That is because a great amount of force is usually required in order to cause cause a broken shoulder blade. Scapula fractures are usually the result of blunt trauma caused in heavy impact collisions like car accidents, truck accidents, motorcycle accidents and slip and fall accidents. In fact the majority of scapula If there was enough trauma to cause a fractured collarbone then it is likely that other parts of the upper body sustained an injury. 80 percent of the time a broken scapula comes with a collarbone, sternum, rib, arm, head and lung injuries.

Broken Collarbone (Clavicle Fracture)

Broken Collarbone (Clavicle Fracture)

A broken clavicle causes significant pain to the affected area and makes it difficult to move the arm and shoulder. Often times the skin around the collarbone will be swollen, tender and bruised. A popping or crackling noise can result when attempting to raise your hand. A bulge, bump or some other deformity will exist above the clavicle. This is the displaced bone. A compound fracture could cause the bone to pierce the skin. A clavicle fracture will also cause the shoulder to sag.

About Fractured/Broken Rib Injuries

About Fractured/Broken Rib Injuries

One of the major downsides of a fractured or cracked rib injury is the inability to treat the injury with a cast. The ribs cannot be constricted and a cast of some type would restrict or prevent breathing. The breathing process slows the recovery period because the ribs expand and contract with every breath. Fracture ribs take longer to heal than most other bone fractures because the ribs are continually forced to move with every breath. Recovery time can be anywhere from 4 to 8 weeks depending on the location and severity of the fracture.

About Broken/Fractured Arm Injuries

About Broken/Fractured Arm Injuries

Broken arms are one the most common injuries. Children, adolescents and adults can all suffer arm fracture injuries. Arm fractures account for approximately 50 percent of all the bone fractures that occur on a yearly basis. Often times these injuries are caused by another person’s negligence or carelessness. Great amounts of force are required in order for any of the arm bones to fracture.

About Broken Bones and Fractures

About Broken Bones and Fractures

Bone fractures are a common occurrence. Most people will experience at least two fractures over the course of their lifetime. Generally speaking, the older we get the weaker our bones grow. As we age our bones lose density becoming thinner and more brittle over time. Broken bones and fractures occur when the amount of force exerted on the bone is stronger than the bone. Car, truck and motorcycle accidents and other accidents producing high impact collisions are quite capable of generating enough force to break bones. Degenerative bone conditions like osteoporosis also make bones more susceptible to the stress generated in high impact collisions.