Smoke Inhalation and Respiratory Failure

Smoke inhalation is the leading cause of death due to fires. It produces injury through several mechanisms, including heat (thermal) injury to the upper airway, irritation or chemical injury to the airways from soot, asphyxiation, and toxicity from carbon monoxide (CO) and other gases such as cyanide.(1) Common Types of … Read more…

Child Contact Burn Accident

A contact burn is typically the result of a child’s skin having direct contact with a hot object such as a curling iron, cigarette lighter, fireplace, grill, kitchen instrument, candle or other hot object or flame. These burns–often second-degree burns–can be the result of accidents. They can result from leaving hot objects within a child’s reach or because of defective products produced without appropriate warning labels. They can even result from placing a child in a car seat or safety belt that has been exposed to the sun for too long.

Child Chemical Burn Accident

According to the American Burn Association, chemical burns account for three percent of all burn center admissions. The biggest risk factor is a child’s easy access to these chemicals in the home. Children can swallow toxic substances, like drain cleaner or laundry detergent, or spill bleach on their skin. Chemical burns which occur in the eyes or to the mouth require immediate medical attention. In some instances exposure to certain chemicals, such as hydrofluoric acid, may not cause immediate pain to your child. A slow, deep pain develops with hydrofluoric acid.

Child Hot Food and Liquid Burns

Every day, children are burned by hot water or food. These incidents send young children to the emergency room on a regular basis. The biggest culprits are typically hot foods—sometimes still on the stove—as well as hot bath water and spilled drinks, such as hot coffee. Children can suffer from first, second, or third degree burns as a result of coming into contact with hot foods and liquids.

About Child Burn Injury Claims

Every day 300 children ages 0 to 19 are treated in emergency rooms all across the United States for burn injuries. Approximately 20,000 children under the age of 4 are hospitalized every year because of burn injuries. Everyday at least 2 children die from burn injuries. Infants, toddlers and preschoolers are especially susceptible to scald burns caused by hot liquids and steam while older children usually sustain flame burns.

Burn Injuries

Hundreds people die every year from complications due to burns and even more experience non-fatal burn injuries and permanent scarring. Burn accidents can happen anywhere: at work, home or in a restaurant. Defective equipment, negligence and the carelessness of others are usually to blame. Burn victims almost always have the right get compensated for their pain and suffering, lost wages, medical bills, and scarring injuries.

Scarring Injuries

Scars on the hands, neck or face serve as a constant reminder for an accident and often conjure up memories of a traumatic event. They can also have a serious effect on a person’s self-image and self-esteem.

Scars are caused by many different kinds of accidents. Dog bites, burn accidents, motor vehicle accidents, slip and fall accidents, and premises liability accidents are but a few of the types of accidents that are capable of producing scars.