Globe Rupture: Left Untreated Can Lead to Permanent Loss of Vision

Globe Rupture: Left Untreated Can Lead to Permanent Loss of Vision

If not treated immediately (and sometimes even if it is), it can result in permanent loss of vision in the affected eye. In many cases, the ruptures are untreatable, and the eye must be replaced with an ocular prosthesis. It is especially important that, during emergency transport, the eye is protected from any pressure, including something as benign as an eye patch.

Traumatic Hyphema: Blurred, Distorted Vision, Headaches, and Pain

Traumatic Hyphema: Blurred, Distorted Vision, Headaches, and Pain

A hyphema occurs when blood pools within the anterior chamber of the eye—usually due to some form of trauma to the globe—resulting in injury to the iris and leading to torn vessels. While they can also spontaneously arise given the presence of certain conditions, they are most commonly caused by trauma or ocular surgery.

Hyphemas are notoriously difficult to treat, and close evaluation and follow-up is mandatory, as there is a high risk for rebleeding. Some patients need to be hospitalized, especially those with particular conditions, such as sickle cell disease, or those with bleeding diathesis, for example. For others, medical professionals typically manage via an eye shield, ensuring that activities are limited and the head is elevated at least 45 degrees.

Traumatic Iritis: Signs, Symptoms, Treatment, and Pursuing Compensation

Traumatic Iritis: Signs, Symptoms, Treatment, and Pursuing Compensation

Traumatic iritis (also known as anterior uveitis) occurs when the iris because inflamed, typically due to some type of trauma that has occurred (usually blunt eye injury, such as from a pellet gun, firecracker, vehicle accident, etc.). Research has shown that younger and/or male individuals tend to suffer more frequently from iritis than older and/or female individuals. Oftentimes, initial trauma can be prevented by wearing eye protection while engaging in certain activities that can lead to iritis.

Research has shown that younger and/or male individuals tend to suffer more frequently from iritis than older and/or female individuals. Oftentimes, initial trauma can be prevented by wearing eye protection while engaging in certain activities that can lead to iritis.

Corneal Abrasions: Causes, Treatment, and Seeking Compensation for Your Injury

Corneal Abrasions: Causes, Treatment, and Seeking Compensation for Your Injury

A corneal abrasion essentially results when you scratch your eye and, as a result, the cells of the corneal epithelium are disrupted. While often times, blinking allows you to flush an object out of your eye, when it is scratched, blinking typically does not provide relief, and even exposure to light can cause pain. While many people can recover from corneal abrasions without surgery or eye damage, sometimes the scratches can run deeper, resulting in corneal infections and/or scarring. If these issues are not treated properly, an individual can end up suffering from long-term vision issues (especially if the abrasion is in the center of the cornea, right in front of the pupil).

Loss of an Eye Due to an Accident

Loss of an Eye Due to an Accident

Enucleation is the surgical removal of the entire eye. The muscles that are attached to the outside of the eyeball are left intact. If the muscles are not injured during the accident, they will help move the prosthetic eye implant and mimic natural eye movements.

Torn and Detached Retina

Torn and Detached Retina

The retina sends visual images to the brain through the optic nerve. Located in the back of the eye, a detached retina occurs when the retina is pulled away from its normal position or tears. When detachment occurs, vision is blurred. If left untreated, a torn or detached retina leads to blindness. Almost all patients with torn or detached retinas must have surgery to restore the retina back to its normal position.