Fractured or Broken Sternum – Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Seeking Compensation for Your Injury

Fractured or Broken Sternum – Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Seeking Compensation for Your Injury

The most common symptoms of a sternum fracture are pain, spasms, and tenderness of the chest. Moving, coughing, sneezing, and breathing make pain worse. Some people experience crepitus – a crunching sound when they move or breath – the sound is the broken bones rubbing together. Beyond the breastbone, the internal organs, like the heart and lungs, may become injured and hurt. Other related conditions include pulmonary contusions, cardiac contusions, and myocardial ischemia (reduced blood flow to the heart) or myocardial infarction (heart attack).

Fractured Proximal Humerus (Broken Arm)

Fractured Proximal Humerus (Broken Arm)

Five percent of all fractures involve the proximal humerus. People sixty-five years and older sustain more proximal humerus fractures than any other kind of fracture expect hip and wrist fractures. The top of the humerus is also known as the humeral head. The humeral head connects with the shoulder blade to form the shoulder joint.

Broken Shoulder Blade (Scapula Fracture)

Broken Shoulder Blade (Scapula Fracture)

Scapula fractures represent less than one percent of all fracture injuries. That is because a great amount of force is usually required in order to cause cause a broken shoulder blade. Scapula fractures are usually the result of blunt trauma caused in heavy impact collisions like car accidents, truck accidents, motorcycle accidents and slip and fall accidents. In fact the majority of scapula If there was enough trauma to cause a fractured collarbone then it is likely that other parts of the upper body sustained an injury. 80 percent of the time a broken scapula comes with a collarbone, sternum, rib, arm, head and lung injuries.

Broken Collarbone (Clavicle Fracture)

Broken Collarbone (Clavicle Fracture)

A broken clavicle causes significant pain to the affected area and makes it difficult to move the arm and shoulder. Often times the skin around the collarbone will be swollen, tender and bruised. A popping or crackling noise can result when attempting to raise your hand. A bulge, bump or some other deformity will exist above the clavicle. This is the displaced bone. A compound fracture could cause the bone to pierce the skin. A clavicle fracture will also cause the shoulder to sag.

Separated/Dislocated Shoulder

Separated/Dislocated Shoulder

There is a difference between a separated shoulder and a dislocated shoulder. It’s important to distinguish a separation from a dislocation because each injury has its own treatment. The mobility and flexibility that gives the shoulder the ability to twists, turn and reach in multiple directions also makes it susceptible to injuries. The location and symptoms of the injury will determine whether it is a dislocation or separation.

Biceps Tendon Tear At The Shoulder

Biceps Tendon Tear At The Shoulder

The biceps muscle and tendon are located at the front upper arm. The biceps helps stabilize the shoulder and allows the arm to bend at the elbow. The long and short head bicep tendons can sustain partial tears or complete tears. Partial tears are also know as partial thickness tears or frays. These tears do not completely tear the tendon in two. Complete tears are also known as full thickness tears. Full thickness tears rip the tendon into two pieces disconnecting the biceps from the shoulder.

Labral SLAP Tear (Shoulder Socket Injuries)

Labral SLAP Tear (Shoulder Socket Injuries)

The shoulder joint socket is very shallow and therefore unstable. The glenoid is the part of the shoulder blade (scapula) that makes up the socket. The labrum (glenoid labrum) is a layer of tissue/cartilage that lines the shoulder socket. The labrum in effect turns the shallow socket into a deeper socket. This gives the ball, or the head of the humerus bones (humeral head), more room to fit into the socket. The labrum stabilizes the ball-and-socket shoulder joint by keeping the ball (humeral head) in the socket (scapula).

Torn Labrum (Shoulder Socket Injuries)

Torn Labrum (Shoulder Socket Injuries)

The shoulder joint socket is very shallow and therefore unstable. The glenoid is the part of the shoulder blade (scapula) that makes up the socket. The labrum (glenoid labrum) is a layer of tissue/cartilage that lines the shoulder socket. The labrum in effect turns the shallow socket into a deeper socket. This gives the ball, or the head of the humerus bones (humeral head), more room to fit into the socket. The labrum stabilizes the ball-and-socket shoulder joint by keeping the ball (humeral head) in the socket (scapula).

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder, or adhesive capsulitis, is a shoulder condition that causes pain in the shoulder joint and immobilizes the shoulder by significantly reducing its range of motion. Often times the shoulder has to be completely immobilized when someone suffers a rotator cuff injury or shoulder fracture. For instance a sling is used to immobilize an injured shoulder. Immobilization allows the injury to set because constant motion aggravates the underlying injury. It can take two –four months for a shoulder fracture injury to heal.

Bursitis/Subacromial Bursitis

Bursitis/Subacromial Bursitis

The shoulder is comprised of three main bones. The humerus (upper arm bone), Scapula (shoulder blade) and Clavicle (collar bone) all merge to form a ball-and-socket joint. The end of the humerus (also known as the humeral head) meets with the scapula. The scapula in turn joins with the clavicle. These three bones are connected by ligaments.

Rotator Cuff/Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Rotator Cuff/Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Impingement syndrome occurs when the surrounding bones are knocked out of alignment or compress or pinch the muscles and tendons of the rotator cuff. Car accidents, truck accidents, motorcycle accidents, slip and fall accidents and other trauma related accidents can cause this compression. Consistent compression and pinching can irritate and inflame the rotator cuff muscles. Consistent compression reduces the blood flow in the muscles. Reduced blood flow hardens the muscle which reduces elasticity and causes the muscle tissue fray.Lifting your hands above your head, moving your hands behind the back of your head and other shoulder movements can perpetuate this cycle of compression/pinching and painful inflammation and irritation.

Rotator Cuff Tear

Rotator Cuff Tear

The Rotator Cuff mainly consists of a group of tendons and four muscles that connect the upper arm bone (humerus) to the shoulder blade (scapula). Additionally, the tendons of the rotator cuff help stabilize the shoulder while the muscles facilitate rotation and movement of the shoulder. Rotator cuff tears are the most common shoulder injury. The rotator cuff consists of the following muscles: teres minor, infraspinatus, supraspinatus and subscapularis.

Rotator Cuff Injuries

Rotator Cuff Injuries

The rotator cuff can be injured in a slip and fall accident especially if someone sticks a hand out to brace for a fall and lands hard on the hand and arm. Rotator cuff injuries are common in car accidents and truck accidents. In the case of front-end collisions and side-impact accidents the driver will see the accident coming and will usually grip the steering wheel tight in order to brace for impact. This is can also be the case in rear-end accidents if the driver happens to see the accident coming in his or her rear view mirror. Most of the force generated by the impact in these collisions gets absorbed by the shoulders and rotator cuffs.

Shoulder Injuries

Shoulder Injuries

The shoulder is one of the most movable and mobile joints in the body. Whether it’s swinging a golf club, shooting a basketball, combing your hair, brushing your teeth, or pouring a glass of milk we rely heavily on our shoulders in everyday life. However, the flexibility, versatility and mobility of the shoulder is source of instability. The things that make the shoulder so useful and important also make it vulnerable to injury. The shoulder is susceptible to the following injuries and conditions: fractures, tears, separations, dislocations, sprains, strains, arthritis and tendinitis.