Conveyor Belt Injuries

Experienced Conveyor Belt Accident Attorneys Manufacturers and warehouses everywhere rely on the use of conveyor belts, which introduced an unparalleled way of quickly transporting large number of goods throughout factories. Improperly constructed conveyor belts as well as belts that are not properly maintained or operated, however, can create a significant
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Forearm Amputations and Wrist Disarticulation

Upper limb amputations are most commonly caused by accidents, infections, burns, tumors, disease, and/or birth conditions, with trauma and cancer being the lead causes. With a wrist disarticulation, the limb is amputated at the wrist, whereas with a forearm amputation (transradial), the amputation runs from the elbow to the wrist. These types of injuries can result from trying to block impact during a car accident or fall, or as the result of working with heavy machinery or under other dangerous conditions. Sometimes they result from infection or from other medical procedures.

Transhumeral Amputations and Elbow Disarticulations

Elbow dislocations and transhumeral amputations tend to result from catastrophic injuries, whereby the bones of the arm (humerus) or forearm (radius and ulna, forming the lower parts of the elbow) are dislocated. Approximately 20,000 to 30,000 people undergo amputations every year for one reason or another, and they can be complete or partial.

Leg or Arm Amputation: Car Crashes and Workplace Accidents Account for 45% of all Amputations

There are close to 2 million people in the United States living with a loss of a limb or extremity. Trauma from a car crash or workplace accident represent 45% of all amputations. (Source: Amputee Coalition). Motor vehicle accidents, motorcycle accidents, bicycle accidents or a pedestrian being struck by a car, motorcycle or bike as well as workplace injuries and falls all may lead to an amputation. Below knee amputations are the most common amputation.

Dislocated Hip

If you have experienced a hip dislocation after a traumatic incident or a car crash, you may have injured your hip. Make sure you are examined and diagnosed by a medical doctor immediately. You may be able to pursue compensation for damages such as medical bills, pain and suffering, permanent injury or disability, costs of physical therapy and rehabilitation, lost wages from missed work, diminished earning capacity, mental anguish and emotional distress, punitive damages, and/or property damage or loss.

Dislocated Elbow

There are two types of dislocated elbows: a partial dislocation (subluxation) and a complete dislocation. A partial dislocation occurs when the ulna bone and or radius bone partially separates from the humerus and elbow joint. A complete dislocation occurs when the ulna bone and or radius bone completely separates from the humerus or elbow joint.

Separated/Dislocated Shoulder

There is a difference between a separated shoulder and a dislocated shoulder. It’s important to distinguish a separation from a dislocation because each injury has its own treatment. The mobility and flexibility that gives the shoulder the ability to twists, turn and reach in multiple directions also makes it susceptible to injuries. The location and symptoms of the injury will determine whether it is a dislocation or separation.