Garbage, Trash and Recycling Collection Truck Accidents

Truck or garbage collection trucks make frequent stops on their routes. A trash truck operator may stop his truck hundreds of times each shift. Over and over these operators are stopping and starting, and getting out of their trucks to physically remove residents’ trash from their trash cans and receptacles. Often times garbage truck drivers will get distracted over the course of their collection route. A distracted or careless garbage collector working on narrow suburban and city roads and operating a large trash truck that has many blindspots and lacks maneuverability is prone to getting into sideswipe accidents, intersection accidents, rear end accidents, pedestrian accidents and bicycle accidents.

Snow Plow Accidents

Accidents involving private and municipal snowplows and salt and sanding trucks occur throughout Massachusetts every winter. Massachusetts is known for its winters and the snowfall that blankets the region’s highways and streets. Snow plow operators are under a great deal of pressure to plow as many streets, driveways and parking lots as they can in a shift. Driveways, highways, streets and parking lots need to be plowed, salted and sanded by the time customers wake-up for work and business open their doors to the public. It’s not uncommon for a snow plow driver to work a 24 hour shift when a Nor’easter pounds the area over the course of two days.

Bus, Truck, and Car Accidents Involving Pedestrians

Although most pedestrian injuries and fatalities happen at intersections, it’s also possible to be hit by an out-of-control vehicle as you’re walking on the sidewalk, in a parking lot, or even in a recreational area (like a park or beach). Less cut-and-dried are cases where the pedestrian has been walking, or jogging, down the side of the street rather than on the sidewalk. As stated above, Massachusetts law dictates that cars give pedestrians a reasonable right-of-way, but in these instances “right-of-way” may be subject to interpretation. At the very least, drivers are required to slow down and give you plenty of leeway when attempting to pass you on the street.

18 Wheeler Truck Accidents

There are several causes of tractor-trailer accidents. Truck drivers are expected to work long hours. Often times truck drivers are pushing to meet delivery deadlines and as a result become fatigued or are forced to drive on little sleep. Driving under these conditions is inherently dangerous. 18-wheelers also have more blind spots than the average motor vehicle. Frequently truck drivers will proceed to change lanes or make turns without realizing an automobile is in their blind spot. This can result in the semi side swiping the automobile. However, all passenger vehicles have a duty to accommodate an 18-wheeler’s blind spot. Mechanical failure, drug and alcohol use are some of the other causes of accidents.