Leg or Arm Amputation: Car Crashes and Workplace Accidents Account for 45% of all Amputations

What Is An Amputation?

Leg or Arm AmputationAn amputation is the surgical removal of all, or part of a limb, or extremities. Extremities or limbs include an arm, leg, foot, hand, toe or finger.

There are close to 2 million people in the United States living with a loss of a limb or extremity. Trauma from a car crash or workplace accident represent 45% of all amputations. (Source: Amputee Coalition).

What Causes An Amputation?

Motor vehicle accidents, motorcycle accidents, bicycle accidents or a pedestrian being struck by a car, motorcycle or bike as well as workplace injuries and falls all may lead to an amputation. Below knee amputations are the most common amputation.

What Are The Reasons For An Amputation?

An amputation of a limb or extremity may be necessary to address poor circulation because of damage to the arteries. Without proper blood flow, the cells in the extremities do not get enough oxygen causing the tissue to die. As the tissue dies an infection may occur.

Severe injuries, like from an automobile accident or serious burn, may lead to amputation if a limb or extremity is injured. A serious infection in an injured limb that does not respond to antibiotics or other treatments can cause tissue to die and prompt an amputation to stop the spread of the diseased tissue.

For a free, no-obligation case review and consultation call our law firm today at (508) 588-0422 and you will have taken your first step towards getting fair compensation for your injuries or for the loss of a loved one. You can also click here to use our Free Case Evaluation Form.

How Is An Amputation Performed?

Amputations are done under general or spinal anesthesia which numbs the body from the waist down. The procedure itself varies in terms of the limb or extremity at issue and the victim’s overall health. Diseased tissue and any crushed bones are removed, any uneven areas of the bone are smoothed over, blood vessels and nerves are sealed and muscles are cut and shaped so that the end of the limb will be able to have an artificial limb attached to it.  The surgeon determines where to cut and how much tissue to remove to address the diseased tissue or poor circulation issues.

In-patient hospitalization following an amputation is standard recovery protocol. Victims spend up to 14 days in the hospital and are monitored for progress and any complications. Rehabilitation and therapy continue post-surgery to help the victim adjust to new prosthetic and loss of limb or extremity.

Compensation For An Amputation

If you have lost a limb or extremity after a traumatic incident or a car crash, make sure you are examined and diagnosed by a medical doctor immediately. You may be able to pursue compensation for damages such as medical bills, pain and suffering, permanent injury or disability, costs of physical therapy and rehabilitation, lost wages from missed work, diminished earning capacity, mental anguish and emotional distress, punitive damages, and/or property damage or loss.

Massachusetts Accident Victim Attorneys

If you or a loved one has experienced a loss of a limb or extremity after blunt trauma or a severe car crash because of someone else’s negligence and would like to discuss your legal options, contact an experienced Boston Arm Amputation Lawyer today for a free consultation.

The Law Offices of Gerald J. Noonan has a proven track record with over 35 years of legal experience representing victims of serious injuries in southeastern Massachusetts.

Free Legal Consultation, Brockton Accident Attorneys

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case.


Our Brockton Amputation Lawyers assist motor vehicle and other accident victims throughout all of Massachusetts including, but not limited to, those in the following counties, cities and towns: Plymouth County including Brockton, Plymouth, Bridgewater, Marshfield, Hingham, Duxbury, Wareham, Abington, Rockland, Whitman, Hanson, Middleborough; Norfolk County including Quincy, Stoughton, Dedham, Weymouth, Braintree, Avon, Holbrook, Randolph, Canton, Sharon, Brookline, Franklin; Bristol County including New Bedford, Fall River, Taunton, Attleboro, Mansfield, Easton, Raynham, Norton; Cape Cod, Falmouth, Barnstable and the Greater Boston area including Cambridge, Dorchester, Everett, Lawrence, Chelsea, Lynn, Revere, Roxbury and Somerville.

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