About

Patrick J. Noonan

Attorney Patrick J. Noonan has earned hundreds of dismissals, negotiated favorable plea agreements, and he’s tried and won Not Guilty verdicts on cases ranging from misdemeanors to serious felonies.

Brief Biography

Patrick J. Noonan was born and raised in Brockton, Massachusetts. Patrick is the son of Gerald J. Noonan, a former Plymouth County Assistant District Attorney, Brockton Public School teacher, and now criminal defense practitioner. Patrick is the grandson of Joseph B. Noonan, who served on the Brockton Police Department for 40 years as a Sergeant. Patrick is the great-grandson of Joseph A. Noonan, one of the first Irish-Catholics elected to city government in Brockton. Patrick is the youngest of four boys with three older brothers: Sean, Ryan, and Brendan.

Education

Patrick J. Noonan attended Coyle & Cassidy High School in Taunton, Massachusetts where he was a three-year letterman on the varsity football team. During his senior year, Patrick was elected Captain of the varsity football team. Patrick was a standout two-way starter for the Warriors. Patrick was the smallest offensive lineman in the league and he was the smallest defensive lineman on the team. During high school, Patrick was also the Captain of the Raynham Powerlifting Team. During his junior year, Patrick won the Massachusetts State Powerlifting Title and he placed Third in the New England Open Powerlifting Championship. In 2002, Patrick won the Raw National Powerlifting Championship for his weight class.

Patrick attended Stonehill College in North Easton, Massachusetts. Patrick was a Dean’s List student at Stonehill and earned membership to Phi Alpha Theta for his conspicuous attainments and scholarship in the field of History. Patrick earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History and graduated with Honors.

Patrick attended the University of Massachusetts School of Law at Dartmouth. Patrick earned the distinction of Dean’s List as a first-year and third-year law student. Based on his excellent academic performance, Patrick was awarded the honor of serving on the editorial staff of the law review’s publication of Trends and Issues in Terrorism and the Law. (5 U. Mass. Roundtable Symp. L. J. (2010). At UMass, Patrick received an award for his contributions to the Dean’s Pro Bono Program. Patrick also received a Special Recommendation from the Dean of the Law School for his valiant efforts in saving the life of a fellow student. A fellow law student collapsed in the library and stopped breathing. Patrick immediately performed CPR and resuscitated him before the ambulance arrived. Patrick was a member of the first graduating class at UMass School of Law. Patrick graduated with High Honors near the top of his class.

Professional Background

Sidebar with the honorable Richard Chin. The trial for a former Boston firefighter accused of assaulting his wife began Tuesday in Brockton Superior Court.<br /> Richard R. Parker, who worked for the Boston Fire Department for nearly 26 years and was also a 9/11 responder, faces a charge of assault to murder amid others against his wife, Kimberly Boleza Parker, from an alleged incident in 2011. Parker died March 10, 2013 of causes that have not yet been determined.<br /> On Dec. 18, 2011, at 5 a.m., police responded to a 911 call placed from their Satucket Avenue home reporting that Parker was “threatening his wife with a knife,” police logs show.<br /> In a written testimony following the incident, Kimberly Parker described a violent scene in which Parker was throwing knives at her while she stood pinned against a bedroom wall, according to court records.<br /> She was able to escape, she wrote, after one knife took a bad bounce and landed out of sight.<br /> Parker, 58, of 3 Satucket Ave., was indicted in 2012 following his wife’s testimony in front of a grand jury. He is charged with kidnapping; assault to murder; assault with a dangerous weapon, a knife; threat to commit a crime and intimidation of a witness.<br /> Police, on two prior occasions before 2011, responded to the home for abuse reports.<br /> Kimberly Parker died March 10, 2013 at age 45 in her East Bridgewater home of causes that have not yet been determined.<br /> (Marc Vasconcellos/The Enterprise)

Sidebar with the honorable Richard Chin. (Photo: Marc Vasconcellos/The Enterprise)

While attending law school at night, Patrick worked full-time at the Law Offices of Gerald J. Noonan as a law clerk. As a law clerk, Patrick researched and drafted Criminal Motions on a wide variety of legal issues. Patrick drafted Motions to Dismiss and Motions to Suppress Evidence that were filed and argued in the District and Superior Courts. Patrick worked under the tutelage of his father, Attorney Gerald J. Noonan, a very experienced and seasoned trial lawyer. Patrick gained invaluable experience working alongside his father by second-seating many evidentiary hearings, district court trials and serious felony trials in the Superior Court.

Upon graduating and passing the Massachusetts Bar Exam, Patrick dove right into practice and within his first week as a newly licensed attorney Patrick won a dismissal in an OUI-Liquor case in which his client flipped his vehicle on the highway, rolled over several times, and crashed into construction equipment.

Since then, Attorney Patrick J. Noonan has been fighting zealously for his clients. He’s represented clients on a wide variety of cases, such as violent crimessex crimesdrug crimesfirearms crimestheft crimes, property crimes, and operating under the influence. Patrick has earned hundreds of dismissals, negotiated favorable plea agreements, won cases on legal arguments, suppressed incriminating evidence, permanently sealed criminal records, saved his clients from serious jail time, and he’s tried and won Not Guilty verdicts on cases ranging from misdemeanors to serious felonies.

From left, defense attorney Patrick Noonan, shows East Bridgewater police officer Peter Belmore, a photograph of the couples home a door panel leading into the laundry room that seemed to be kicked out. The trial for a former Boston firefighter accused of assaulting his wife began Tuesday in Brockton Superior Court.<br /> Richard R. Parker, who worked for the Boston Fire Department for nearly 26 years and was also a 9/11 responder, faces a charge of assault to murder amid others against his wife, Kimberly Boleza Parker, from an alleged incident in 2011. Parker died March 10, 2013 of causes that have not yet been determined.<br /> On Dec. 18, 2011, at 5 a.m., police responded to a 911 call placed from their Satucket Avenue home reporting that Parker was “threatening his wife with a knife,” police logs show.<br /> In a written testimony following the incident, Kimberly Parker described a violent scene in which Parker was throwing knives at her while she stood pinned against a bedroom wall, according to court records.<br /> She was able to escape, she wrote, after one knife took a bad bounce and landed out of sight.<br /> Parker, 58, of 3 Satucket Ave., was indicted in 2012 following his wife’s testimony in front of a grand jury. He is charged with kidnapping; assault to murder; assault with a dangerous weapon, a knife; threat to commit a crime and intimidation of a witness.<br /> Police, on two prior occasions before 2011, responded to the home for abuse reports.<br /> Kimberly Parker died March 10, 2013 at age 45 in her East Bridgewater home of causes that have not yet been determined.<br /> (Marc Vasconcellos/The Enterprise)

From left, defense attorney Patrick J. Noonan, shows East Bridgewater police officer Peter Belmore, a photograph. (Photo: Marc Vasconcellos/The Enterprise)

The trial for a former Boston firefighter accused of assaulting his wife began Tuesday in Brockton Superior Court. Richard R. Parker, who worked for the Boston Fire Department for nearly 26 years and was also a 9/11 responder, faces a charge of assault to murder amid others against his wife, Kimberly Boleza Parker, from an alleged incident in 2011. Parker died March 10, 2013 of causes that have not yet been determined. On Dec. 18, 2011, at 5 a.m., police responded to a 911 call placed from their Satucket Avenue home reporting that Parker was “threatening his wife with a knife,” police logs show. In a written testimony following the incident, Kimberly Parker described a violent scene in which Parker was throwing knives at her while she stood pinned against a bedroom wall, according to court records. She was able to escape, she wrote, after one knife took a bad bounce and landed out of sight. Parker, 58, of 3 Satucket Ave., was indicted in 2012 following his wife’s testimony in front of a grand jury. He is charged with kidnapping; assault to murder; assault with a dangerous weapon, a knife; threat to commit a crime and intimidation of a witness. Police, on two prior occasions before 2011, responded to the home for abuse reports. Kimberly Parker died March 10, 2013 at age 45 in her East Bridgewater home of causes that have not yet been determined. (Marc Vasconcellos/The Enterprise)

BROCKTON SUPERIOR COURT – Attorney Patrick J. Nooonan holding a knife while questioning a police officer during the trial of Richard Parker, a man accused of assaulting his wife. Parker, who worked for the Boston Fire Department for nearly 26 years and was also a 9/11 responder, faces a charge of assault to murder amid others against his wife, Kimberly Boleza Parker, from an alleged incident in 2011. . (Marc Vasconcellos/The Enterprise)