Ativan (Lorazepam) Possession Lawyer

Ativan is a Benzodiazepine. Benzodiazepines, also known as ‘benzos’, are considered tranquilizers and they are mainly used to treat anxiety, insomnia, panic attacks, seizures and alcohol withdrawal. Benzos act on the central nervous systems causing several effects including: anxiolytic effects (anxiety relief); hypnotic effects (promotes sleep); anticonvulsant effects, and sedating effects.

Valium (Diazepam) Possession

Valium is a Benzodiazepine. Benzodiazepines, also known as ‘benzos’, are considered tranquilizers and they are mainly used to treat anxiety, insomnia, panic attacks, seizures and alcohol withdrawal. Benzos act on the central nervous systems causing several effects including: anxiolytic effects (anxiety relief); hypnotic effects (promotes sleep); anticonvulsant effects, and sedating effects.

Methamphetamine Possession

Methamphetamine possession is a serious crime in Massachusetts. Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 94C outlines the penalties for possession of Methamphetamines. Methamphetamine is a Class B Substance in Massachusetts. A conviction for possession carries the following penalties:

1st Offense: Up to 1 year in a House of Corrections and/or a fine of up to $1,000. An additional fine of $150 to $500. Loss of drivers license for 1 year.

2nd Offense: Up to 2 ½ years in a House of Corrections or County Jail and/or a fine of up to $2,000. An additional fine of $150 to $500. Loss of drivers license for 1 year.

Additional penalties exist if the possession occurred within 1000 feet of public or private school grounds or within 100 feet of a playground. [See Drug Charges in a School Zone.]

Klonopin (Clonazepam) Possession

Klonopin is a Class C substance. Anyone found guilty of illegal possession of Klonopin faces penalties under Massachusetts law: Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 94C outlines the penalties for illegal possession of this drug. Klonopin (also known as clonazepam) is designated a Class C Substance in Massachusetts. A conviction for illegal possession of Klonopin carries stiff penalties.

Forging and Uttering False Prescriptions

Over the years state and local police in Massachusetts have made a point to enforce prescription drug laws. The penalties for illegally possessing or distributing Oxycontin, Percocet, Vicodin, and other prescription drugs have increased dramatically over the years. Illegal prescription use is very common these days. Pain killers are more addictive than most drugs and often times using these drugs for legitimate purposes can create a dependence that leads to illegal use and prescription fraud. Violators of the prescription drug laws include patients, doctors, nurses and pharmacists.

Forgery usually deals with creating a false document or alternating a genuine document in order to make it false for the purpose of defrauding. Uttering deals with passing off the forged document as a real one with the intent to defraud. Almost any document can be forged and uttered. However checks and prescriptions are the documents that are most commonly forged. Someone can be charged with forging a false prescription even if they didn’t utter it and someone can be charged with uttering a prescription even if they didn’t forge it.

Exploiting Minors in the Trade

Under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 94C Section 32K it is a felony to induce or force anyone under age of eighteen to distribute, dispense or possess with the intent to distribute a controlled substance. It is also a felony the induce or force a minor to accept, deliver or possess money used for buying, manufacturing, delivering, distributing or selling any such controlled substance. This crime was enacted to prevent the distribution of drugs but also to stop the victimization of underage children by adults who manipulate them for their own criminal needs. Prosecutors take these charges very seriously and apply a great amount of time, energy, and state resources toward getting a conviction.

Criminal Penalties For Drug Trafficking

Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 94C Section 32E governs the drug trafficking laws in Massachusetts. State officials in Massachusetts consider drug trafficking as the most serious drug crime and as a result the law imposes severe penalties for a conviction. In addition to proving drug possession the prosecutor, in order to obtain a conviction for drug trafficking, must show that defendant knowingly possessed, distributed, manufactured, or cultivated a certain amount of drugs. Different drugs require different quantities in order for a trafficking charge to stick.

Possession with Intent to Distribute Class B Narcotics (Ecstasy, Cocaine, PCP, LSD, Amphetamines, Methamphetamines)

Possession with the intent to distribute Class B Controlled Substances is a crime that is proven through circumstantial evidence. Juries can infer a defendant’s intent to distribute by looking at the defendant’s conduct leading up to the arrest, the amount of narcotics present at the arrest, whether the defendant had large amounts of cash on or near his or her person at the time of the arrest, and the presence of any drug paraphernalia that is used to distribute drugs (i.e., scales, plastic bags.)

Drug Paraphernalia Offenses

It is a crime in Massachusetts to sell, possess with intention to sell, or manufacture with the intention of selling drug paraphernalia. If you are convicted of possession of drug paraphernalia with intent to sell you are facing a minimum of 1 year and a maximum of 2 ½ years in the house of corrections or a minimum fine of $500 up to a maximum of $5,000, or both a fine and jail time. If you are convicted of selling drug paraphernalia to a minor (anyone under 18) you are facing imprisonment in a state prison up to 5 years and at least 3 years and a fine ranging from $1,000 to 5,000 or a fine and jail time.

Counterfeit Drug Crimes

Counterfeit drugs are really fake drugs that appear similar to real drugs. In order to get a conviction for distributing counterfeit drugs the prosecution has to show that the defendant knew the drugs were counterfeit and distributed them anyway. Often times the prosecutor will have to use circumstantial evidence to prove the defendant knew the drugs were counterfeit. If there is evidence that the defendant made the drugs or made statements to an undercover officer to the effect the he knew the drugs were counterfeit than this might support a conviction.

Knowingly Present Where Heroin is Kept

If you have been accused of or charged with knowing where heroin is kept, you are facing serious charges and serious penalties if convicted. Besides a complete exoneration of the crime, an experienced drug crimes attorney may be able to undermine the prosecution’s case against you enough for the charges and penalties you face to be substantially reduced. Our legal team also will ensure that you do not face inflated charges.

Possession with Intent to Distribute Class C Narcotics

Possession with the intent to distribute Class C Controlled Substances is a crime that is proven through circumstantial evidence. Juries can infer a defendant’s intent to distribute by looking at the defendant’s conduct leading up to the arrest, the amount of narcotics present at the arrest, whether the defendant had large amounts of cash on or near his or her person, and the presence of drug paraphernalia that is used to distribute drugs (i.e., scales, plastic bags.)